Do you know where money is made in construction?

excluding the office punter’s club, the coke machine on site, or “incentives” from the ‘well-meaning’

This is not a trick question and for some it may just sound a bit naive.   However, believe it or not, some construction companies lose site of this.  They get caught up in support services like HR, IT and finance, which are extremely important activities, but only in so far as they support the primary activity of the building company. To erect a structure, on time and to quality, that someone will pay for. That someone being the owner/developer, supported in most cases by his/her funder. The funder generally engages the services of a QS to put a figure on the progress of the build based on the percentage of works complete.  So this is where the builder makes the money.

On the Jobsite

It is the builder’s job to make sure program is met and quality maintained so he gets paid on schedule.  Then he can pay what he owes.  Sounds pretty basic but somewhere along the line some builders lose site of these priorities or just don’t have the resources to make sure they happen.

So what are the critical components for a successful build and who provides the resources?

A lot has been written about this but I believe it can be condensed down to the following:-

The right

  • site manager,
  • documents,
  • subcontractors,
  • supplies,
  • and the last 3 delivered at the right time.

This is not necessarily a definitive list by any means.  Some would argue that QA and Safety be identified on their own. However it is my experience that when you have the right site manager quality and safety follow, like a truck and dog.  A good site manager drives site safety for his workers and quality for his client.  His site is his responsibility and he knows it.   He is a strong leader with a firm hand whose mission it is to keep everyone’s “eye on the prize”. The project delivered on time, to quality, with margin in tact and everyone delivered safely home at the end of each day.

Obviously it is the builder who is responsible for finding the right site manager.

So where does etender come into the picture?

Right from the get go – from estimate through to the end of construction.  By helping you find the right subcontractors and suppliers who will perform on site and providing you with an easy to use system.

A straight-forward collaboration area means office and site people have direct access to the latest documents as they become available from the consultants. System generated automatic addendums and a site app ensures subcontractors are up to date, in and out of their offices.   Everyone on the build is on the same page with a “we’ve got your back” mentality and isn’t that what you want?  To make money and have a happy workplace.

That’s how etender’s document control and tender management system fits into your equation.  It saves you time and money and helps create a project with less angst. It is not rocket science. It’s about doing the right things, in the right way, to make sure the Jobsite has what it needs, when it needs it,  in order to meet program and make margin.

You can take our short quiz and see if you have what it takes to make margin on your projects now.

https://survey.zohopublic.com/zs/cMB05V

(copy and paste into your browser).

www.etender.net.au

 

Recall of Infinity electrical cabling

27 August 2014

Non-compliant electrical cable has been recalled nation-wide due to the risk of possible electric shock and fire.

The recall of Infinity and Olsent branded electrical cable imported by Infinity Cable Co Pty Ltd and sold by various wholesalers and retailers comes after testing found the cable failed Australian electrical safety standards.

Office of Fair and Safe Work Queensland head, Dr Simon Blackwood said there is no immediate danger, but home and business owners should act now to prevent possible electric shock or fire in future years.

“The plastic insulation coating around the cable degrades faster than normal, especially if exposed to heat, which over time makes it brittle and if disturbed it may crack and be more likely to expose bare wire,” Dr Blackwood said.

“Infinity cable was supplied in Queensland from 2012 to 2013 and it is estimated that 680km of the cable is installed in homes and commercial buildings state-wide.

“The company recalled some products in August 2013 and Infinity cable was banned from sale in October 2013, but the cable already installed in the homes and businesses of Queenslanders also needs to be addressed.

“Home and business owners who had wiring done in 2012 or 2013 should contact their electrician to find out if Infinity cable was used.

“Under the recall, any affected cable installed in accessible areas, such as roof spaces, must be removed and replaced unless it is in appropriate conduit and is fitted with an electrical safety switch.

“If the cable is near a heat source, such as heaters, hot water systems and the like, it must be removed.

“Inaccessible cable, such as in wall cavities, that remains installed must be fitted with an electrical safety switch.

“If any Infinity cable remains in a building, a warning sticker must be placed at the electrical switchboard.

“If you are unsure who performed the electrical work, you can ask any qualified and licensed electrician to perform a safety inspection for you.

“Never try to check electrical cable yourself,” Dr Blackwood said.

Fair Trading Executive Director Brian Bauer said the Australian Consumer Law protects consumers from costs associated with unsafe products.

“If there is Infinity cable present, suppliers have a responsibility to pay for the cable to be made safe,” Mr Bauer said.

“As long as you can confirm Infinity cable is present and who supplied it, you can approach that cable supplier to have them fix the problem free of charge.”

More information about the recall of Infinity cables, including the recall notice, is available at www.fairtrading.qld.gov.au or www.electricalsafety.qld.gov.au.

 

Calculating working days

Looking for a quick way to calculate the working days for a contract.  Have found this great site you can customize for Australia.

http://australia.workingdays.org/

Subbie of the week

FUTURE FLOORS (QLD) – Commercial floor covering specialists

Specializing in complete supply and installation packages – carpets, vinyl, engineered floor systems, expoxy, safety flooring, hand tufted rugs, entry mats…..

“Service and pricing are second to none and their team of installers are friendly, on time and easy to work with on site.”

Call Matty Smith on 07 3335 1333

Friendliest Man in Floor Coverings

Friendliest Man in Floor Coverings

Check them out at http://www.futurefloorsqld.com/

Always look out for your mate on site

Yes safety is primarily the responsibility of the individual but staying alert and keeping an eye out for your friend can help prevent things like this happening.

Workplace Health and Safety Queensland is investigating a fatal incident that occurred on Sunday 27 July 2014 in Fortitude Valley.

A worker died after falling into a two metre deep trench which collapsed while being excavated to replace a sewer line.

Could this happen anywhere your employees are working?

This  is a reminder for you and your organisation to consider the effectiveness of your safety management systems in preventing an incident like this from occurring at a workplace.

For information on workplace health and safety visit the Workplace Health and Safety Queensland website at www.worksafe.qld.gov.au.

Workplace Health and Safety

There is no such thing as an accident on site –  just carelessness, lack of supervision and proper procedure.

As shocking as it may sound in this case a 4 metre block wall was blown over by the wind because it had no bracing or core filling.

Workplace Health and Safety – Collapse of Block Walls